How Can Canadian Startups Access AngelList?

The recent phenomenon of AngelList in the US holds a promise of revolutionizing seed funding for startups. The reason for it is three-fold: it addresses the toughest stage of startups – I call it “Two guys and a piece of paper” – financing, it applies the effective principle of risk-sharing, and thanks to the recently passed US JOBS act, it uses a legal framework which makes it palatable to the investors and founders. With the recent addition of the syndication mechanism it all works even better. The question is how could Canadian (or other non-US) startups access it and benefit from this nirvana?

There are at least two practical issues to address:

  • The legality of fundraising through the sale of equity under Canadian laws. The issue is that under the current Canadian securities laws, startups can only raise money by selling equity in their business to so-called “accredited investors,” who are strictly defined and typically include family members, angel investment firms, or venture capitalists. Should you wish to raise funds from a broader circle of individual investors, your company needs to go through a process of stock listing on a publicly traded exchange that is normally prohibitive to the startup. Alternatively, you need to operate under an exemption. More details on that are available in an excellent and succinct six-page document, “General Overview of Canadian Securities Laws Relating to Raising Capital By Early Stage Companies” prepared by FMC Law, members of the CrowdSourcing Advocacy Committee of CATA, and available through their office. Are there any other complications when soliciting funds in the US?
  • The practicality and the effectiveness of a Canadian startup (“Two guys and a piece of paper”) raising funds in the US market. Clearly, investing abroad in an unknown entity is yet another hurdle to overcome for US investors. The reality is that only a few sophisticated US investors would feel comfortable in this scenario.

One of the solutions to these concerns might be a structure involving a US holding parent company, say a Delaware corporation. That way the US parent corporation receives the investment through AngelList and flows through the funds to its Canadian subsidiary which is the operating entity. A structure like this might even qualify as a CCPC for tax purposes. In addition, we get the benefit of the generous Canadian SRED refund for R&D expenses (up to 65%) while simplifying a potential liquidity event (exit) for the benefit of the US investors. I have used an investment structure like this in one of my previous ventures and can vouch that the complexity and the cost overhead is quite reasonable.

So, since the issues around AngelList are new and fresh, now is your chance to weigh in. Please share your experience, thoughts, and views in the Comments section below.

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