Equity Crowdfunding Comes to Ontario – finally!

Canadian-100-dollar-billsThis could be big, really BIG! For entrepreneurs and startup founders this could be a monumental change, potentially opening the floodgates onto the dry and barren land of seed funding. At the very least it should offer new options for cash-starved startups and early-stage businesses. The recently proposed (as of March 20, 2014) Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) new set of regulations provides for

“a crowdfunding exemption that would allow businesses, particularly start-ups and early stage businesses, to raise capital from a potentially large number of investors through an online platform registered with the securities regulators.”

More specifically, this ‘Crowdfunding Exemption’ would allow startups and SMEs to raise up to $1.5M per 12 month calendar year with investors being able to invest up to $2,500 per deal and up to $10,000 per year.

Why is this so important, then? The issue is that under the current Canadian securities laws, startups can only raise money by selling equity in their business to so-called “accredited investors,” who are strictly defined and typically include family members, angel investment firms or venture capitalists. Should you wish to raise funds from a broader circle of individual investors, your company needs to go through a process of stock listing on a publicly traded exchange that is normally prohibitive to a startup.

The advancements in internet technology, however, make it possible these days to approach and raise the required capital in small amounts from a much broader group of individuals. Why is this approach relevant? It all has to do with risk management and sharing. To illustrate the issue let me quote from my article recently published in The Ottawa Citizen.

“Let’s say I need to raise $0.5M for my startup. I go to you and ask you for the whole sum or just a $100K chunk. Even assuming you have the means, you are going to agonize at length over your decision. However, if I ask you to invest $10-15K, you will spend far less time worrying and be much more predisposed to take the chance. By employing this tactic, an entrepreneur will likely raise her $0.5M because the risk is shared among many investors and each of them does not risk that much.

This is exactly how I raised, some time ago, angels financing for ATMOS Corp. I brought in about 20 private investors, with each contributing between $10K and $25K. The beauty of this approach is that nobody is going to loose sleep and the entrepreneur gets his objective accomplished. In fact, this is the same principle in action that powers the IPOs and syndicated VC rounds albeit in a smaller scale. It works, therefore, use it.”

The key to increase seed financing in this country is to implement some practical systemic initiatives. People respond to incentives. If we want to encourage seed funding to enable entrepreneurship and startups we need to create incentives which reward financial risk taking. The OSC proposal is a good step forward to create a viable framework enhancing options for seed investing. The Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance (CATA) led by John Reid should be congratulated for spearheading the industry lobbying effort. Not to rest on laurels, the Angel Investment Incentives initiative should be advocated, advanced and implemented next. With these two in place we would have a really strong system platform to support the entrepreneurial startup culture in Ontario.
Nevertheless, some folks are concerned about a potential for fraud and taking advantage of un-sophisticated investors. Would you agree that the advantages outweigh the risks? What do you think?

PS
The Notice and Request for Comment is available for public consultation on the OSC website www.osc.gov.on.ca and the comment period runs until June 18, 2014.

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Comments

  1. This is great news. It needs to happen. And most of us who have been in the “Internet world” for a long time have seen this coming for years.

    Of course, there need to be protections, presumably in the form of both government oversight as well as peer review. You mentioned “practical systemic initiatives.”

    What are they?

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    • When I mention “practical systemic initiatives” I mean policy and economic initiatives which become part of our socio-economic system usually instituted by the federal or provincial governments. For example, to support innovation and R&D efforts we have Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR&ED) Program which is a federal tax incentive program, that encourages Canadian businesses of all sizes, and in all sectors to conduct research and development (R&D) in Canada. The SR&ED Program gives claimants cash refunds and / or tax credits for their expenditures on eligible R&D work done in Canada.This is an example of a “systemic initiative” which goes beyond just talk and appeals to provide system support for companies undertaking innovative development. Similarly, an angel investment tax credit as implemented in British Columbia provides a systemic support for seed funding in Canadian startups. More on this in this post http://wp.me/p3MqCi-2l

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  2. Game changing Equity Crowdfunding explained at ECFA Ottawa Conference, June 3, 2014, Tuesday at The Marshes Golf Club – A must for startups, investors, lawyers, accountants, etc.
    Details and registration: http://ow.ly/w1XXh

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